Can’t do without a televison? Don’t waste your time coming to Coll!
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Shark watching/swimming

The south end of Coll is THE basking shark place, with hundreds sometimes in the next bay to Breachacha at Crossapol. You may see them from the shore, though there are now specific boats that can take you swimming with them. There is even an annual shark festival on Coll. The best time for sharks is when there is a high-pressure system around, with calm sunny weather and loads of plankton.
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Bird watching

Glendyke sits in a RSPB reserve. However most of the island is a birders paradise. Corncrakes can be heard almost constantly in early summer, and can seen if you are patient. The boggy areas teem with redshank and snipe - who’s roding calls often liven-up an evening walk. Northern species include Artic skuas, bonxies and Greenland whitefront geese,  with other rarities including hen harriers who quarter over the castle park and Glendye for much of the summer. The moorland sees short-eared owls, pipits, ravens and pergegrine - the list goes on…
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Beautiful beaches and coves

Coll beaches are just the finest anywhwere with dunes of blown shell sand, and aquamarine waters, usually deserted except for seals and birds. Many are small and secluded, others more-open storm-beaches, each with a particular charm. And the views are truly stunning - the whole panorma of the Treshnish isles and Mull on the east, with views westwards to the outer Hebrides 50 miles away on a clear day.

History

Ancient burial grounds, clan edifices, ruins of communities and hillsides of lazy-beds, there’s plentry of history for those interested. There is a Hebridean History Society based on Coll for more information.
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Unique flora

The blown shell-sand of the south creates the unique lalkaline landscape known as machair, which becomes an ever-changing carpet of colour through the seasons, bright yellows early on giving way to vivid pinks and crimsons in June. Much of the north is acidic peat bog, and tea- stained lily ponds, with rarities including Lady’s tresses orchids. And where acid meets alkaline shell-sand, there is more unique flora again.  

Things to do on Coll

Coll is an out-door lovers wonderland in the most sceniically spectacular setting. There are storm beaches for watersports and swimming, wild lochs for skinny dipping, calm bays for paddling, secluded coves for sunbathing, gentle roads for cycling and walks with wonderful views. For the naturalist there are beautiful and rare species in huge numbers, from birdlife to bumble bees, from orchids to cetaceans such as Minke whale. Seals abound, and otters are spotted in the bay at Arinagour daily - all just amazing.
Glendyke Isle of Coll

Fishing

The seas around Coll still contain fish, unlike most of the Scottish mainland. There is excellent rock fishing for pollock up to 6lb, with superb tope fishing in Gunna Sound and on the west side of the Isle (boat required). Mackerel can be caught from the main pier. There are also some peat lochs with free- taking brownies. Nearly as much fine is ‘spooting’ - catching razor-fish at low tide on spring-tides, satisfying that hunter-gatherer instinct.
Glendyke, self-catering cottage on the Isle of Coll, Argyll, Scotland

Things to do on Coll

Coll is an out-door lovers wonderland in the most sceniically spectacular setting. There are storm beaches for watersports and swimming, wild lochs for skinny dipping, calm bays for paddling, secluded coves for sunbathing, gentle roads for cycling and walks with wonderful views. For the naturalist there are beautiful and rare species in huge numbers, from birdlife to bumble bees, from orchids to cetaceans such as Minke whale. Seals abound, and otters are spotted in the bay at Arinagour daily - all just amazing.
Glendyke Isle of Coll

Shark watching/swimming

The south end of Coll is THE basking shark place, with hundreds sometimes in the next bay to Breachacha at Crossapol. You may see them from the shore, though there are now specific boats that can take you swimming with them. There is even an annual shark festival on Coll. The best time for sharks is when there is a high-pressure system around, with calm sunny weather and loads of plankton.
More Info More Info

Bird watching

Glendyke sits in a RSPB reserve. However most of the island is a birders paradise. Corncrakes can be heard almost constantly in early summer, and can seen if you are patient. The boggy areas teem with redshank and snipe - who’s roding calls often liven- up an evening walk. Northern species include Artic skuas, bonxies and Greenland whitefront geese,  with other rarities including hen harriers who quarter over the castle park and Glendye for much of the summer. The moorland sees short-eared owls, pipits, ravens and pergegrine - the list goes on…
More Info More Info

Beautiful beaches and coves

Coll beaches are just the finest anywhwere with dunes of blown shell sand, and aquamarine waters, usually deserted except for seals and birds. Many are small and secluded, others more-open storm- beaches, each with a particular charm. And the views are truly stunning - the whole panorma of the Treshnish isles and Mull on the east, with views westwards to the outer Hebrides 50 miles away on a clear day.

History

Ancient burial grounds, clan edifices, ruins of communities and hillsides of lazy-beds, there’s plentry of history for those interested. There is a Hebridean History Society based on Coll for more information.
More Info More Info

Unique flora

The blown shell-sand of the south creates the unique lalkaline landscape known as machair, which becomes an ever-changing carpet of colour through the seasons, bright yellows early on giving way to vivid pinks and crimsons in June. Much of the north is acidic peat bog, and tea- stained lily ponds, with rarities including Lady’s tresses orchids. And where acid meets alkaline shell- sand, there is more unique flora again.  

Fishing

The seas around Coll still contain fish, unlike most of the Scottish mainland. There is excellent rock fishing for pollock up to 6lb, with superb tope fishing in Gunna Sound and on the west side of the Isle (boat required). Mackerel can be caught from the main pier. There are also some peat lochs with free-taking brownies. Nearly as much fine is ‘spooting’ - catching razor-fish at low tide on spring-tides, satisfying that hunter-gatherer instinct.